As a Shropshire florist I love flowers, but one of my favourites is Gypsophila or Baby’s Breath as it is sometimes refered. I’m one for a bit of ‘Gyp’ in a jam jar as a sideboard or table dressing. It’s whimsical, effortless but oh so pretty.

Once seen as just a filler to a larger flower arrangement, and there was a time when Gyp fell out of favour because some thought it looked dated. Today Gypsophila is being viewed as a flower in its own right. With the vintage renaissance that this decade has encouraged, a bit of Gyp is not only a pretty filler to the bridal bouquet but can hold a floral arrangement and theme all on its own.

Move over other wedding flowers, Gypsophila is back…

Bouquets
Create an charming bridal bouquet or bridesmaid posy with a cluster of Gypsophila. The bouquet looks delicate but strong enough to make an impression.

A wedding bouquet created with just gypsophila makes a stunning impact for any bride.

A wedding bouquet created with just gypsophila makes a stunning impact for any bride.

Buttonholes
This buttonhole made from Gypsophila and foliage looks quirky and cool. Great for a Groom who dares to be different.

A grooms buttonhole made from gypsophila .

A grooms buttonhole made from gypsophila.

Table Decoration
Never underestimate the impact of grouping one flower type. These Gypsophila wedding table centres are no exception.

Wedding table arrangements of gypsophila

Wedding table arrangements of gypsophila.

Venue decoration
Whether it’s large pomanders of Gypsophila suspended from a wedding venue ceiling or simple sprigs of Gyp placed in a glass jar surrounding a candle, these venue decorations can perfect the wedding venue. I particularly like the Gypsophila door wreath – it would look gorgeous on the Church or wedding venue door.

Gypsophila suspended from a ceiling of a wedding venue.

Gypsophila suspended from a ceiling of a wedding venue.

Sprigs of gypsophila placed surrounding a candle make a effective yet simply table arrangement.

Sprigs of gypsophila placed surrounding a candle make a effective yet simply table arrangement.

A gypsophila door wreath would look stunning on the door of the church or wedding venue.

A gypsophila door wreath would look stunning on the door of the church or wedding venue.

Wedding cake
A collection of Gypsophila sprigs resting on each cake tier makes for a stunning wedding cake. We would advise that you use flowers made from sugar paste on an iced cake or artificial Gypsophila. If you are going to use real Gyp on a wedding cake make sure it rests on some cloth and not directly on the icing because the plant is not edible and can be harmful if digested.

A gorgeous wedding cake with gypsophila.

A gorgeous wedding cake with gypsophila.

Pew Ends
A bunch of Gypsophila secured by ribbon to a chair or pew end makes for a striking seating decoration at civil ceremony or Church wedding. The repetition of the bunches defines the aisle and gives impact as you walk down it. We like how these pew ends include floor length voile to complete the look.

 

Gypsophila pew ends frame the aisle.

Gypsophila pew ends frame the aisle.

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